Now that’s funny…

laugh

Why is it that some of my favorite films are animated? Because so many times, their writers throw in lines with the most brilliant adult humor (and by that I don’t mean, inappropriate – I mean humor that adults will get and appreciate) that I can’t help but want to see the movie and hear those lines over and over and over again.

Like:
Monsters, Inc.
Mike

Mike: “You’re in kindergarten, right? I used to love kindergarten. Best three years of my life.”

 

 

Toy Story

toy story

Mr. Potato Head: “Oh, really? I’m from Playskool.”

Rex: “And I’m from Mattel. Well, I’m not really from Mattel, I’m actually from a smaller company that was purchased by Mattel in a leveraged buyout.”

Buzz: “I’m setting my laser from stun to kill”

Woody:
“Oh great, great. Now if anyone attacks us, we can blink ‘em to death”

Mr. Potato Head: “Oh my little sweet potato”

Mrs. Potato Head:
“….. oh it’s so nice to have a big strong spud around the house.”

Toy Story 3

Hamm: “Let’s go see how much we’re going for on Ebay!”

The Incredibles

incredibles

Helen: “I can’t believe you don’t want to go to your own son’s graduation.”
Bob: “It’s not a graduation. He is moving from the 4th grade to the 5th grade.”
Helen: “It’s a ceremony!”
Bob: “It’s psychotic! They keep creating new ways to celebrate mediocrity.”

I found myself saying “It’s not a graduation” when our kids “graduated from kindergarten.”

Some of these funny, adults-will-appreciate lines exist in picture books too. Here are a few:

In The Three Ninja Pigs by Corey Rosen Schwartz

three ninja pigs

The Wolf looked quite shaken,
But hollered, “Yo, Bacon. I’m not at all scared of your tricks.”

 

The “Yo, bacon” part of this line is so funny and clever that I just want to read it over and over and over again.

In Sophie’s Squash by Pat Zeitlow Miller,

sophie

 

Sophie says, “I’ll call her Bernice.” In response, Sophie’s mother says, “I’ll call for pizza.”

Ha! When dinner plans go awry, doesn’t someone always call for pizza?

Sophie’s mother tells Sophie’s  father, “Well, we did hope she’d love vegetables.”

So, be careful what you ask for when you wish for your kids to love vegetables…

 Chicks Run Wild by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen
chicks run wild
Mama shows them how to prance.

And how to do the chicken dance.

 


Which makes any mom that ever did the chicken dance smile and of course relive those moments with the song then engrained her mind. (pointing at self)
And…

One last kiss for each dear child.

She leaves the room…

and Mama runs wild!

Which means of course, doing her nails, reading a book and watching TV – exactly how a mom of 5 would go wild.

Nugget and Fang by Tammi Sauer

N & F

 

 

 

“The stuff on that poster isn’t true,” said Nugget. “My best friend is a shark!”
HAVE YOU LOST YOUR GILLS?
SHARKS AND MINNOWS CAN’T BE FRIENDS!
HELLO – SHARKS EAT MINNOWS!
Nugget was shocked . (And apparently delicious.)

Ok, maybe finding that last line funny is a bit sick, but I do. It’s funny!
And…

On Wednesday, Fang tried a different approach.
HE WANTS
TO EAT
YOU
FOR DINNER!
“Holy mackerel!” said Nugget.

So how funny is it that a fish is saying Holy mackerel?

When my kids were PB age (way back when) I recall reading the same book over and over and over again and I appreciated it when it was a book I enjoyed, one that was clever, and made me chuckle. When writing see if you can throw a brilliantly funny line in for your adult reader and gain a fan for life!
worm

Hooray for Girl Power

I love Disney movies – the old and the new. And I’m thrilled to see that over the years  Disney female characters such as Mulan, Jasmine and Elsa have become much stronger. They’re all still beautiful, (and of course, unfortunately, ridiculously skinny) but now they’re much more independent female role models.

But more needs to be done to advance the image of female characters, especially in this highly technological day in age. I often ask myself where are the films with the STEM-smart girls. I can find plenty of STEM-smart characters that are males, like genius Lewis in Meet the Robinsons, scientist Flint Lockwood in Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs and inventor Hiccup in How to Train your Dragon. Sure, Sam Sparks, played a meteorologist in Cloudy but she wasn’t the star of the movie. And then when Disney had their chance with Gabriella in High School Musical, Gabrielle called herself “the freaky math girl”…really? Although she did later go on to compete in the scholastic decathlon, those words, “the freaky math girl”  were still stuck in my mind :(

HSM

Smart, beautiful, talented and socially savvy, she ‘s an ideal STEM role model for young girls. But, put “freaky” in the equation and all is lost….

Even in the television series, Phineas and Ferb, Phineas and Ferb are the geniuses while Candace is portrayed as annoying, weak and whiny. Thankfully, Doc McStuffins came along giving kids not only a cute and smart female main character (and role model), but one that also represents diversity.

But now, finally hitting the big screen is Big Hero 6, where girls are portrayed as cute and super-smart, techy smart – and in the case of Honey Lemon, fashionable too, which will hopefully inspire young girls to view the STEM fields as inviting, exciting and cool!.

bighero6

Click the link below to catch the interview with Big Hero 6’s  Jamie Chung, voice of Superheroine GoGo Tomago, Industrial Design and Mechanical Engineering Student, and Genesis Rodriguez, voice of Superheroine Honey Lemon, Chemical Engineering student, and find out how they feel about the amazing characters they play.

http://www.wzzm13.com/story/entertainment/2014/11/04/girl-power-big-hero-6/18460911/

Yay Disney!

 

 

Halloweensie contest

It’s time for Susanna Leonard Hill’s 4th Annual HALLOWEENSIE CONTEST!!!!!
The Contest:  write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (title not included in the 100 words), using the words pumpkinbroomstick, and creak.

THE SQUEAK, THE CREAK & THE CAT by Dawn Young

In a haunted old house, a small mouse that went squeak

scurried about on a floor that went creak.

That creak woke the cat, all scraggly and black,

who wanted that mouse for his Halloween snack.

He chased that small mouse, while his claws sliced and slashed,

leaving the pumpkins all gutted and gashed.

That small harmless mouse, now ravenous too,

escaped up a broomstick and into some brew.

After a fizzle, a sizzle and BOOM,

out popped a mouse-monster as big as the room.

That beastly-like creature, eyeballing the cat,

swiped and then kitty just vanished…

like that.

Gulp!

Halloweensie

 

 

Halloween season

With Halloween only weeks away, I thought I’d share a fun, sorta –spooky, a tad bit kooky, tale from the grave.

Skeleton Cat
It’s Skelton Cat
by Kristyn Crow

This book is clever on so many levels. And of course, I can’t resist Kristyn Crow’s fabulous rhyme.

It’s filled with onomatopoeia, alliteration and word play. Here are just a few of my favorite lines from the story:

“He went: Rattle, rattle. Clink, clink.
Rattle, rattle, clink.
Tip, tap. Clickety-clack.
Ka-plink, ka-plink, ka-plink.”

These lines are just fun for the tongue!

And these with alliteration and consonance, add to the rollicking rhythm:

“He rocked and he rollicked
and he clunked around,
and the kids in the playground
heard the rattlin’ sound.”

And this line, just makes me smile:

“He reached the audition and he stood in line
and they taped number 20 on his feline spine.”

which is funny since his spine is exposed :) and I love the internal rhyme in feline spine.

And the word play in these lines:

“when the band members saw him, well, they called him nuts.
“Cause ‘You’re not gonna make it if you don’t have guts!’”

I love the play on words with guts…

And along those same line:
“ ‘Sure you’ve got rhythm, but have you got soul?’ So the skeleton cat went on a roll…”

So, if you’re looking for a clever story this Halloween season, check it out, it’s a fun read for kids and adults!
HH

The Road Too Well-Traveled

Everyone that knows me, knows I’m all about girl empowerment, and not just talking about it. I know that nothing happens if all we do is talk about something. Change rarely results from a statement. Change requires action. And although there are many areas where I feel change is well-overdue, one that is near and dear to my heart is changing the stereotypes that math is for boys and that smart girls are socially awkward. Why? Because as a female engineer who worked for years in highly technical industry, sadly, I know that these paradigms can affect a girl’s choices.

If we can change those prehistoric misconceptions and get girls to believe that they too have a place in the world of STEM then we can power this country by tapping into some of the brightest and innovative minds in the world – the minds of our girls!

So, when it comes to doing math, we really need to stop the “That’s ok, girls are better at other things” and/or “I was never good at math either” messages. Those messages are a hall passes to the road too well-traveled, the road that is keeping girls away from STEM careers, away from math and away from science. Instead, encourage girls and challenge them with math. Point girls down the the road less traveled – the road to STEM! Visit A Mighty Girl for stories about incredible women in STEM and check out their recommendations for girl empowering books and toys.

Even though this is old news, it’s not that old, and it bears repeating…

STEM

 

Back in May President Obama hosted and actively engaged in the White Houses’ fourth annual Science Fair, “where more than 100 students exhibited their science projects and experiments from previously won technology, engineering, and math (STEM) competitions across the country.”

 

“The White House chose to highlight girls and their inventions at the fair because Obama had stressed the importance of more females majoring in STEM fields in college and working in these industries after they graduate. Among Tuesday’s displays were a “concussion cushion” designed by Maria Hanes, 19, of Santa Cruz, Calif. Hanes, who wants to be the first female collegiate head football coach, invented a football helmet with gel and memory foam inserts that can better prevent concussions.”

At the Science Fair, “Obama also focused on the importance of girls taking STEM classes and women pursuing science and math in college. According to a study by the American Association of University Women, girls and boys take STEM classes at the same rates in high school. But that changes drastically when women enroll in college and start their careers. Only 25 percent of women in college major in STEM classes, and 24 percent of the STEM workforce is women.”

Read the whole story here:

http://www.takepart.com/article/2014/05/28/obamas-white-house-science-fair

The White House is doing their part.
And by writing girl empowering picture books, sharing girl empowering stories (online and in real life) and providing math tutoring to girls who find themselves struggling (or better yet, working ahead), I’m doing my part. (Although I continually strive to do more in this area.)
See what part you can play, see what you can do to empower a girl…

 

Poetic techniques in a PB

I’ve always been a fan of figurative language. Ahh…the alliteration, assonance, consonance….I just can’t get enough of it.

One of my all-time favorite picture books is Tell the Truth, B.B. Wolf by Judy Sierra and when I finally broke it down and analyzed its poetic techniques, I realized why.

BB

Tell the Truth, B.B. Wolf

by Judy Sierra

The story begins with Miss Wonderly inviting the Big Bad  Wolf to the library to tell the story of how he met the three little pigs. But, when he does, not everyone agrees with his version of the story.

 

Judy Sierra uses figurative language, repetition, and rhyme to enhance the story and even includes references other stories to add humor.  The lines in this book are so fun to read and so clever – making Tell the Truth, B.B. Wolf a poetic playground!

Here are just a few of the great lines filled with alliteration, assonance, consonance, and a bit of rhyme. (there were too many examples to feature, so I skipped a few)
“At the library, Miss Wonderly led B.B. Wolf to a cozy chair in the story corner.  B.B. started off with a song.”

Wrong!” squeaked a little voice. Your middle name is B-A-D”

Song, and Wrong and little and middle add a  nice rhythm through rhyme.

Later the wolf says,
“All of a sudden, I smelled smoke. I followed my nose and found another little piggy playing with matches next to a pile of sticks.”

Then to add some humor (especially for the adult reader) Pinocchio remarks,
“Isn’t that wolf’s snout getting longer?” which is funny since the wolf is obviously lying.

And even more humor, when the Little Engine exclaims, “I think it is. I think it is.”

And there’s repetition, where the pigs repeatedly oink, “Tell the Truth B.B. Wolf!”

After the wolf tells the truth he vows to change his name,
“ ’Goodness gracious!’ exclaimed B.B. Wolf. ‘I need a new middle name, don’t I?’ He snagged a dictionary from the library shelf and pawed through the pages.”

And later,
“ ‘That’s it! said the wolf. ‘From this day forward I am the one and only Big Bodacious Benevolent Bookish Wolf. In fact, I’ll borrow some books right now.”

And (in an awesome line) assonance..
“ ‘ Toodle-oo! He called to the three pigs.’ See you in a few weeks!’ “

And in the end,

“ ‘Friends,’ said the former menace, ‘it’s not enough for me to say I’m sorry. I have to prove it and repair my reputation. Here is your very own piggyback mansion.’ ”

I love this book more than I did before – the figurative language used in Tell the Truth, B.B. Wolf is fabulous!!!!

 

Fabulous Finishes

FABULOUS FINISH #8

JAM

Just Another Morning

by Linda Ashman

 

 

Right away, this book starts out with “I find myself inside a zoo,” letting you know you’re in for some fun. From the moment the boy escapes the ape, then confronts a monster, wrestles a snake and joins the circus, he takes the reader  on a non-stop adventure. In the end, when he’s captured by giants (parents) and given magic sleeping punch he finally takes a nap, only to wake up and once again declare “I find myself inside a zoo…”

I love the juxtaposition of the boy’s action-packed adventure and his peaceful rest and how the ending brings the reader back to the beginning– GREAT LOOP!

Knock, knock, knock…

As a kid, I grew up with the Three Little Pigs, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, The Three Stooges, and the Three Musketeers, then watched and loved Three’s Company and sang out loud with Tony Orlando and Dawn to “Knock three times on the ceiling if you want me” and Lionel Richie’s, “Once, twice, three times a lady” and now laugh as Sheldon makes his presence known each week on the Big Bang Theory with, “Knock, knock, knock Penny. Knock, knock, knock Penny. Knock, knock, knock Penny.”

sheldon

What’s my point? (other than Sheldon has issues ;)) All of these examples use the Rule of Three.

The Rule of Three claims that things that come in threes are inherently funnier, more satisfying, or more effective than other numbers of things (see, the rule of three was used there too).

 

Per Wikipedia, “The Latin phrase, “omne trium perfectum” (everything that comes in threes is perfect, or, every set of three is complete) conveys the same idea as the rule of three.”

William Edward Hickson (January 7, 1803 – March 22, 1870), commonly known as W. E. Hickson, a British educational writer, is credited with popularizing the proverb:

“‘Tis a lesson you should heed:
Try, try, try again.
If at first you don’t succeed,
Try, try, try again.”

Why does this matter? Because the rule of threes speaks to the heart and art of writing. Whether it be three attempts to overcome an obstacle or three adjectives, verbs or nouns, consecutively joined together to create rhythm,  there is power in threes.

As a PB writer I’ve studied this incessantly and found that unless you are writing a concept book or a linear story, adding the rule of threes is highly effective. When your main character is struggling, a series of three often builds the tension creating suspense, doubt, and struggle, which often leads to that poignant moment where he/she finally undergoes a change and achieves resolution. However, the try/fail, try/fail, try/fail rule of threes is not the only way to apply threes.

Here are some examples where use of the rule of threes was not only effective but brilliant.

N & F

 

Nugget and Fang by Tammi Sauer not only uses the try/fail, try/fail, try/fail rule of threes but also uses the rule of threes throughout –

 

“They swam over. GLUG”
“They swam under. GLUG- GLUG”
“They swam all around. GLUG-GLUG-GLUG”

“HAVE YOU LOST YOUR GILLS?”
“SHARKS AND MINNOWS CAN’T BE FRIENDS!”
“HELLO-SHARKS EAT MINNOWS!”

“On Thursday, Fang tried everything he could think of. A tattoo. A special delivery. A song and dance.”

“On Friday, Fang was out of ideas.
All alone, he swam over. BLUB
He swam under. BLUB-BLUB
HE swam all around. BLUB-BLUB-BLUB”

“Fang was so busy boo-hooing he didn’t notice a net drop
down,
down,
down…”

“The net pulled
up,
up,
up…”

And more.
The use of the rule of threes not only builds tension but adds the rhythm of the story.

sophie

 

In Sophie’s Squash by Pat Zietlow Miller, the rule of threes is used quite a bit to create rhythm.

 

 

 

Sophie says Bernice is
“Just the right size to hold in her arms, just the right size to bounce on her knee, just the right size to love.”

Bernice went everywhere with Sophie – to story time at the library, to visit other quash at the farmer’s market, to practice somersaults in the garden.

Every night, Sophie gave Bernice a bottle, a hug and a kiss.

Then the man at the farmer’s market tells Sophie that what Bernice needs is fresh air, good clean dirt and a little love.

The use of threes in these examples creates the rhythm that makes the story sing.

Bear

 

A Visitor for Bear by Bonny Becker

 

 

 

“When he opened his door there was a mouse, small and gray and bright-eyed.”

And this description of the mouse – small and gray and bright-eyed – is used throughout the story.

These three short, quick descriptive words add to the characterization of the curious, fleeting, mysterious little the mouse.

61Apxt+PXwL

 

Grace for President by Kelley DiPucchio

 

 

 

“Thomas was the school spelling bee champion.
His experiments always took a blue ribbon at the science fair.
And he was captain of the soccer team.”

“Grace came up with a campaign slogan.
Grace listened to what issues were important to the students…
Grace made campaign posters and buttons.”

“At recess she gave SPEECHES.
During lunch, she handed out free CUPCAKES.
After school, she held RALLIES.”

“At recess, Thomas studied his spelling words.
During lunch, he worked on his latest science experiment.
After school, he played soccer.”

Again the use of threes adds a rhythm to the story.

Penguin

 

 

 

 

 

Penguin on Vacation by Salina Yoon

“Penguin had skied, sledded and skated on vacations before.”

Penguin learned some things. You can’t ski on sand. You can’t sled on sand. And you definitely can’t skate on sand.”

“Penguin and Crab played… and played…and played.”

“Sand castle. Catch! Cowabunga!”

“They swam and swam.
They whooshed and pushed.
They fished and wished.”

“Splash! You’re home! Welcome back!”

The use of threes once again establishes the maintains the rhythm of this charming story.

And then to appeal to the engineer in me, I had to include other fascinating facts about the remarkable number 3!

According to Pythagoras and the Pythagorean school, the number 3, which they called triad, is the noblest of all digits, as it is the only number to equal the sum of all the terms below it, and the only number whose sum with those below equals the product of them and itself.

A natural number is divisible by three if the sum of its digits in base 10 is divisible by 3. For example, the number 21 is divisible by three (3 times 7) and the sum of its digits is 2 + 1 = 3. Because of this, the reverse of any number that is divisible by three (or indeed, any permutation of its digits) is also divisible by three. For instance, 1368 and its reverse 8631 are both divisible by three (and so are 1386, 3168, 3186, 3618, etc.). See also Divisibility rule. This works in base 10 and in any positional numeral system whose base divided by three leaves a remainder of one (bases 4, 7, 10, etc.).

Three is approximately π (actually closer to 3.14159) when doing rapid engineering guesses or estimates. The same is true if one wants a rough-and-ready estimate of e, which is actually approximately 2.71828.

 And now as a mom of three perfect kids, I have to agree, three is perfect!

 

Fabulous Finishes

FABULOUS FINISH #7

Mustache baby

 

Mustache Baby

by Bridget Hoes

 

 

 

The story begins with the birth of Baby Billy, sweet lovable Billy, who has a
mustache? Yes, a mustache. Of course, the parents can’t help but wonder if it’s a bad guy mustache, you know the ones that curl up on the ends and scream sinister, or a good guy mustache, the exotic ones that beckon adventure and shout skill
and mastery. Or, both. The story is sprinkled with humor and puns and brimming with darling illustrations.
In the end, after Billy does his time behind bars, it seems like the
neighborhood will live happily ever after until… the neighbor baby comes to play –
the neighbor baby with a beard! Great lead to a bearded baby story (?).