The 7th Annual Halloweensie Contest aahhhrrrooooOOOOO!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN

 The generous and fabulous Susanna Leonard Hill is hosting 

The 7th Annual HALLOWEENSIE CONTEST!!!!!
https://susannahill.com/2017/10/27/the-7th-annual-halloweensie-contest-aahhhrrrooooooooo/

The Contest: write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children (children here defined as 12 and under) (title not included in the 100 words), using the words candy corn, monster, and shadow. (Candy corn will be counted as 1 word.)  Your story can be scary, funny, or anything in between, poetry or prose, but it will only count for the contest if it includes those 3 words and is 100 words (you can go under, but not over!)

In the spirit of Halloween, here’s…

CLOMP, STOMP, CHOMP!
by Dawn Young (100 words)

CLOMP CLOMP

There’s a noise and I’m no longer sleeping

and Yikes! there’s a shadow that’s crawling and creeping.

It’s hairy and scary and has a huge horn.

A monster that’ s growling, “Me want candy corn!”

It grunts and it groans and it’s down on all fours.

I toss my whole bag to the creature, “It’s yours!”

I’m under the covers and scared half to death.

I quietly peek out while holding my breath.

It enters. STOMP STOMP

Comes closer. CHOMP CHOMP

Hey wait!

That big beast with the horrible horn?

Is my sister, still dressed as a pink unicorn!


 

Rejection…

Four years ago I wrote a post about rejection that I often visit because it helps me cope when rejection rears its ugly (or maybe not so ugly) head. 

I have to constantly remind myself that rejection is part of the business. It’s part of life. I thank others who share stories of their rejections, like Kate DiCamillo and her 473 rejections and Drew Daywalt and his tweet: “Dunno if you know this but The Day The Crayons Quit was rejected by every publisher for 6 years before it sold to @PhilomelBooks #keepwriting”  

It reminds me that I’m not alone: that other writers (even the most successful) experience rejection. And as much as we hate it, curse it, dread it, rejection can be healthy. It can keep you grounded, make you strive to get better, and force you to look deep inside to find out what’s important to you. It begs the question “Am I tough enough?”

So, when you get those rejections, think about what they can do for you. Maybe you’ll read more, study more, seek out critiques and learn to welcome them with open arms, and write more stories and less posts 😉

Image result for screen beansImage result for screen beans


and if you’re lucky, maybe you’ll influence a life along the way, without even knowing it, as I was fortunate enough to have done years ago and continue to do…

(below from Feb 11, 2013)

Rejection…
Is so hard to take. The first few rejection letters made me cry. The next few made me angry. Soon after, I simply became numb.  Then finally, the numbness subsided and I grew determined. Determined to defy the odds and be one of those writers that emerges from the slush pile and gets discovered.

It was not until recently, when I took some time to look back on my journey towards publication that I realized I had experienced these phases of growth. In retrospect, I appreciate the rejection, I am indebted to it. It’s changed me.

Rejection has made my writing stronger, made me tougher and made me much more determined to succeed.  After all, anything that’s difficult to achieve is that much more rewarding, right?

But that’s not really what this post is about. Rejection did something so much bigger than that. It affected me in a way I would have never expected. It affected me as a mom. Something happened while I was grappling with my rejection letters, something remarkable…something unexpected, something invaluable. I discovered it during my parent/teacher conference.

My girls (twins) are in the fourth grade, so a parent/teacher conference is nothing new to me. I went in hoping for a glowing report from the teacher and a chance to peek at my daughters’ work. I met with the teacher, received the glowing report I had hoped for, but then, to my surprise, I received something much more.

In my daughter’s Hero paper I read this…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Right then and there I knew what rejection was to me – an opportunity to do something invaluable – to teach my children to NEVER give up! I could have told them this but showing is so much more effective. I had no idea that my daughter was watching. No idea I was her hero because I didn’t give up. And I still haven’t.

 

Picture books that inspire

Sometimes I’ll read a picture book that really stands out to me. Above the normal expectations of having a fabulous story (with plot, and character devolvement, etc.), some picture books also have exceptional elements – maybe the humor (I love a funny picture book), a clever twist, overwhelming emotion that tugs on my heartstrings, language so lovely it sings, or an ending that brilliantly loops back to the beginning.

Which brings me to, Marvelous Cornelius by Phil Bildner. This book is so full of poetic techniques and wonderful lines that I find myself reading it over and over and over again. It’s like a play date at a poetic playground! For me, this book is the mentor text to use for language.

Marvelous

 

 

 

 

 

Whether it be the alliteration,

“He saluted the silver-haired man…”

“He waved to the couple with the baby on the balcony.”

“My young ‘uns!” he called to the kids crowding the corner.”

“Unloading the garbage, not a single praline wrapper ever stayed on the streets. And those spotless streets, oh, how they sparkled.”

“He clapped the covers like cymbals and twirled the tins like tops.”

“People and pets, parks and playgrounds, washed away.

Schools and shops, streets and streetcars, washed away.”

“The barbers, bead twirlers and beignet bakers.”

 

Or the most genius of lines:

“A gumbo of mush and mud.”


And two of my favorites…

“Cornelius rose.

He dried his eyes.

For his spirit and will were

waterproof.”

 

And…

“They streamed into the Crescent City.

Thousands.

Millions.

A flood of humanity.”

type

 

I could go on and on, but then I’d have the whole book retyped here and I’d ruin the magic that awaits you in Marvelous Cornelius by Phil Bildner.

Valentiny Contest

Susanna Leonard Hill’s first ever Valentiny Contest is here! The contest: write a Valentines story appropriate for children (children here defined as ages 12 and under) maximum 214 words in which someone is grumpy!

Here’s’ mine..

GRUMPY BEAR’S VALENTINE (198 words)
by Dawn Young

Mr. Bear did not sleep well; his pillow way too lumpy.

He had nightmares.

He woke up scared.

So Mr. Bear was grumpy!

And when he reached for honey, and then realized he was out,

his tummy growled,

he sneered and scowled,

he moaned and marched about.

He huffed and puffed, with cheeks bright red, he crawled back into bed,

to take a nap

then heard TAP, TAP

A sound that hurt his head.

He shouted “STOP!” and so it did, soon he began to snore,

but then a ring

a ding, ding, ding.

Who dared approach his door?

He stomped his feet and roared, “Who’s there?” The ground and gravel shook.

No voice was heard,

yet something stirred.

Intrigued, he took a look.

Laying there, outside his lair, with honey and a teddy bear…

a heart-shaped note,

that read, I quote,

“For you, because I care.”

His heart swelled up, he couldn’t speak, his chin fell to his chest,

He’d gotten mad,

and now felt bad,

he’d scorned his thoughtful guest.

Then tracking prints, he trailed them to a cave beside the pine,

he tip-toed in

and with a grin

he asked, “Will you be mine?”

bear3

The Heart of the Story

HAWinter break was filled with great times, fabulous food and hours and hours of movie watching with the kids. Typically we watch G-rated, kid-friendly movies and animated holiday classics. But now that our kids are teens we’ve moved onto more “mature” movies with some rather racy content such as Pitch Perfect, Pitch Perfect 2, The DUFF and The Hunger Games series. And although I miss the days of  Mickey’s Once (and Twice) Upon a Christmas and the miserly ol’ Miser Brothers, fortunately, our kids still love some of our tried and true movie favorites, such as Home Alone, Elf and The Santa Clause. So, one night, when my girls suggested watching Home Alone, although I lay on the couch completely exhausted, I optimistically agreed.

I stayed awake for most of the movie, but ended up power-napping for a bit,  unfortunately snoozing through the church scene, where Kevin talks to his scary neighbor Old Man Marley about forgiveness and family and…well, after that, the movie just wasn’t the same for me.

Home Alone

I’m a sap when it comes to sentimental, happy and heartwarming stories and movies. My kids shoot me that “you’re crying again?” look every time something emotional happens, knowing tears will be flowing and pretty soon I’ll transform into a tissue-wielding, nose-running, mascara melting mess.

Even though I’ve seen some of my favorite movies twenty or so times, (at least) and I know full well what’s going to happen, I still cry. But on this particular night watching Home Alone, I didn’t cry. I felt empty, disappointed, left hanging, and without closure. Sure, Harry and Marv got locked up and Kevin’s mom came home but the part of the story that makes me watch it over and over again, the part where Marley and his son are reunited at the end fell flat for me because I didn’t see and feel the build-up that got them there – that hopeful church scene. The normally laugh out-loud, crazy, paint can flying, doorknob singeing, rope cutting scenes didn’t carry the movie for me. I missed (what I consider) the “heart of the story” and Home Alone just wasn’t the same.

As a writer, I know, we all know that the heart of the story matters most but, wow! miss it in one of your favorite movies and you’ll see just how much it matters!

We also know to show and not tell, that showing is much more powerful than telling. So, you can take my word for it and try to imagine the effect that missing this scene had on me, or you can experience the impact for yourself.

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Do it. Try it. Grab your favorite book and skip the lines/pages that tug on the heart, our put in your favorite movie and fast-forward past the scenes with the heart-wrenching lines (or take a power-nap, at least you’ll feel refreshed), and you’ll find that matter how fun a story is, no matter how many funny and clever lines are perfectly delivered, no matter how much your stomach hurts from laughing, what makes a movie watcher and a book reader, go back time and time again is the heart of the story.

Happy New Year!

 

Halloweensie Contest

Susanna Leonard Hill’s 5th Annual HALLOWEENSIE CONTEST is here! The contest: write a 100 word Halloween story appropriate for children, using the words costumedark, and haunt.  

A BIG HUNGRY GRIN

by Dawn Young (97 words)

 

On Halloween night as their party drew near,

the minnows, preparing for tail tingling fear,

got dressed up in costumes; one fattened his fin,

flashed needle-knife teeth and a big hungry grin.

The party was rockin’ the old sunken ship,

still haunted by souls from an ill-fated trip.

Emerging at midnight, those piratey-ghosts,

spooked scale after scale off the guests and the hosts,

all desperately darting out into the dark,

until that wise minnow disguised as a shark,

circled the ghosts, ‘til the ghosts fled in fright,

leaving the minnows to party all night!

 fear2

 

 

It’s that time again…

Yay, November 1st, is just around the corner which means it’s PiBoIdMo.

piboidmo2015participant

Picture Book Idea Month, where you come up with a picture book idea each day during the month of November. With PiBoIdMo, not only do you end up with a boatload of PB ideas, you get inspired by wonderful authors who, like you and me, may need a jump start to get their creativity into gear or just need a verbal hug 😉 There are opportunities to win fabulous prizes too, so sign-up and get inspired!

Summer School?

Summer School? Yes, summer school where you learn from some of the best for FREE!

This year’s’ theme is The Plot Thickens…sounds intriguing and exciting!

 

badgeI’m proud and honored to be on the Board of Education for Kidlit’s 2015 Summer School program alongside Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen, Kami Kinard, Marcie Colleen and Leeza Hernandez.  Join our fabulous community of people and get inspired by writers as passionate about kidlit as you are!

Register here:

http://nerdychickswrite.com/registration-2/

All About That Rhyme

I’m thrilled to be guest blogger on Angie Karcher’s fabulous RhyPiBoMo (Rhyming Picture Book Month)

https://angiekarcher.wordpress.com/2015/03/31/pre-rhypibomo-2015-dawn-young/

As writers, we know we’ve chosen a tough business to break into, and unfortunately, we know it’s even tougher to break into if you write in rhyme. No matter how good your rhyme is, and how perfect your meter reads, we know that many editors and agents refrain from rhyme, making those seemingly insurmountable publishing hurdles even higher for rhymers.
And even though I enjoy writing in prose, deep down inside I’m a rhymer, rhymer;) I am determined to scale those extra inches, feet or miles because …

I’m All About That Rhyme!